A recent article in The New York Times links yellow, blue-blocking lenses (IOLs) like Alcon® AcrySof® IOLs to a range of health woes
The “Aging of eyes is blamed for range of health woes” article appearing in the February 20, 2012 online edition of The New York Times features findings from Drs. Mainster and Turner, renowned researchers in the field of blue light and its role in health.



Healthy transmission of blue light in TECNIS® IOLs

Industry-leading TECNIS® lenses have always been designed to allow the transmission of blue light. Extensive research demonstrates that blue light is essential for scotopic vision and regulating circadian rhythm.1
  • The TECNIS® IOL is a UV-only blocking IOL that reestablishes effective retinal light exposure due to age-related yellowing of the crystalline lens2 and may help restore melatonin suppression

  • Cataract surgery with a UV-blocking IOL that transmits blue light has been proven to decrease insomnia and daytime sleepiness1and improve reaction time3

Give Your Patients Healthy Blue Light

  • Blue-blocking IOLs, such as Alcon's AcrySof® IOL, were developed on the theory that blue light exposure may increase the risk of AMD

  • Numerous peer-reviewed studies have failed to show a link between blue light exposure and AMD4-10

  • The TECNIS® IOL was developed to provide UV-blocking protection while allowing transmission of healthy blue light needed for optimal scotopic vision and healthy circadian rhythms1
Caution: Federal law restricts this device to sale by or on the order of a physician.

Important Safety Information – TECNIS® Multifocal IOL
Indications: TECNIS® Multifocal IOLs are indicated for primary implantation for the visual correction of aphakia in adult patients with and without presbyopia in whom a cataractous lens has been removed by phacoemulsification and who desire near, intermediate and distance vision with increased spectacle independence. The IOLs are intended to be placed in the capsular bag. Warnings: Physicians considering lens implantation under any of the conditions described in the Directions for Use labeling should weigh the potential risk/benefit ratio prior to implanting a lens. Some visual effects associated with multifocal IOLs may be expected because of the superposition of focused and unfocused images. These may include a perception of halos/glare around lights under nighttime conditions. It is expected that, in a small percentage of patients, the observation of such phenomena will be annoying and may be perceived as a hindrance, particularly in low-illumination conditions. On rare occasions, these visual effects may be significant enough that the patient will request removal of the multifocal IOL. Under low-contrast conditions, contrast sensitivity is reduced with a multifocal lens compared with a monofocal lens. Therefore, patients with multifocal lenses should exercise caution when driving at night or in poor-visibility conditions. Patients with a predicted postoperative astigmatism >1.0 D may not be suitable candidates for multifocal IOL implantation since they may not fully benefit from a multifocal IOL in terms of potential spectacle independence. Care should be taken to achieve centration, as lens decentration may result in patients experiencing visual disturbances, particularly in patients with large pupils under mesopic conditions. Precautions: The central one-millimeter area of the lens creates a far image focus; therefore, patients with abnormally small pupils (~1 mm) should achieve, at a minimum, the prescribed distance vision under photopic conditions; however, because this multifocal design has not been tested in patients with abnormally small pupils, it is unclear whether such patients will derive any near-vision benefit. Autorefractors may not provide optimal postoperative refraction of multifocal patients; manual refraction is strongly recommended. In contact lens wearers, surgeons should establish corneal stability without contact lenses prior to determining IOL power. Care should be taken when performing wavefront measurements, as two different wavefronts are produced (one will be in focus [either far or near], and the other will be out of focus); therefore, incorrect interpretation of the wavefront measurements is possible. The long-term effects of IOL implantation have not been determined; therefore, implant patients should be monitored postoperatively on a regular basis. Secondary glaucoma has been reported occasionally in patients with controlled glaucoma who received lens implants. The intraocular pressure of implant patients with glaucoma should be carefully monitored postoperatively. Do not resterilize or autoclave. Use only sterile irrigating solutions such as balanced salt solution or sterile normal saline. Do not store in direct sunlight or in temperatures over 45°C. Emmetropia should be targeted, as this lens is designed for optimum visual performance when emmetropia is achieved. Adverse Events: The most frequently reported adverse event that occurred during the clinical trial of the TECNIS® Multifocal IOL was surgical reintervention, which occurred at a rate of 3.7% (lens-related: 0.6%; non-lens-related: 3.2%). Surgical reintervention included lens exchange, retinal repair, iris prolapse/wound repair, trabeculectomy, lens repositioning and lens removal due to patient dissatisfaction. The second most frequent adverse event was macular edema, which occurred at a rate of 2.6%. Other reported reactions were hypopyon and endophthalmitis, each occurring at a rate of 0.3%. Attention: Reference the Directions for Use labeling for a complete listing of indications, warnings and precautions.

Important Safety Information – TECNIS® Monofocal IOL
Indications: TECNIS® 1-Piece IOLs are indicated for the visual correction of aphakia in adult patients in whom a cataractous lens has been removed by extracapsular cataract extraction. These devices are intended to be placed in the capsular bag. Warnings: Physicians considering lens implantation under any of the conditions described in the Directions for Use labeling should weigh the potential risk/benefit ratio prior to implanting a lens. Precautions: Do not resterilize or autoclave. Use only sterile irrigating solutions such as balanced salt solution or sterile normal saline. Do not store in direct sunlight or in temperatures over 45°C. Adverse Events: The most frequently reported adverse event that occurred during the clinical trial of the 1-Piece lens was macular edema, which occurred at a rate of 3.3%. Other reported reactions, occurring in less than 1% of patients, were secondary surgical intervention (pars plana vitrectomy with membrane peel) and lens exchange (due to torn lens haptic). Attention: Reference the Directions for Use labeling for a complete listing of indications, warnings and precautions.

References
  1. Mainster MA. Violet and blue-light blocking intraocular lenses: photoprotection versus photoreception. Br J Ophthalmol. 2006;90(6):784-92.
  2. Charman WN. Age, lens transmittance, and the possible effects of light on melatonin suppression. Ophthalmic Physiolog Opt. 2003;23(2):181-87.
  3. Schmoll C, Tendo C, Aspinall P, Dhillon B. Reaction time as a measure of enhanced blue-light mediated cognitive function following cataract surgery. Br J Ophthalmol. 2011;95(12):1656-9.
  4. Jackson GR. Pilot study on the effect of a blue-blocking IOL on rod-mediated (scotopic) vision. ASCRS Symposium on Cataract, IOL and Refractive Surgery; 2005 Apr 13–15; Washington, DC.
  5. Hirvelä H, Luukinen H, Läärä E, et al. Risk factors of age-related maculopathy in a population 70 years of age or older. Ophthalmology. 1996;103:871-7.
  6. Delcourt C, Carriere I, Ponton-Sanchez A, et al. Light exposure and the risk of age-related macular degeneration: the Pathologies Oculaires Liées à l’Age (POLA) study. Arch Ophthalmol. 2001;119:1463-8.
  7. McCarty CA, Mukesh BN, Fu CL, et al. Risk factors for age-related maculopathy: the Visual Impairment Project. Arch Ophthalmol. 2001;119:1455-62.
  8. The Eye Disease Case-Control Study Group. Risk factors for neovascular age-related macular degeneration. Arch Ophthalmol. 1992;110:1701-8.
  9. Khan JC, Thurlby DA, Shahid H, et al. Age-related macular degeneration and sun exposure, iris colour, and skin sensitivity to sunlight. Br J Ophthalmol. 2006;90(1):29-32.
  10. Darzins P, Mitchell P, Heller RF. Sun exposure and age-related macular degeneration. An Australian case-control study [409]. Ophthalmology. 1997;104:770-6.
TECNIS is a trademark owned by or licensed to Abbott Laboratories, its subsidiaries or affiliates.
Alcon and AcrySof are trademarks of Alcon Laboratories Inc.
©2012 Abbott Medical Optics Inc.
2012.03.07-CT4832

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